Owner-reported lower urinary tract signs in a cohort of young cats

Louise Longstaff, Timothy Gruffydd-Jones, Tony Buffington, Rachel Casey, Jane Murray

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle (Academic Journal)peer-review

5 Citations (Scopus)
305 Downloads (Pure)

Abstract

Objectives The most common cause of lower urinary tract signs (LUTS) in cats under the age of 10 years is feline idiopathic cystitis (FIC). The prevalence of LUTS in the UK pet cat population is difficult to assess. This study used data collected prospectively to investigate the prevalence of, and risk factors for, owner-reported LUTS in a cohort of young pet cats. 
Methods Cat owners were recruited into a long-term longitudinal study and asked to complete questionnaires at specified age points for their cats. All cats were at least 18 months of age at the time of analysis. The prevalence of owner-reported LUTS at 18, 30 and 48 months of age was calculated, based on whether the owner had seen the cat urinating, and whether the cat had displayed one or more of the following clinical signs: dysuria, haematuria or vocalising during urination. A case-control study to investigate the risk factors for owner-reported LUTS in study cats at age 18 months was also conducted, using a multivariable logistic regression model. 
Results The prevalence of owner-reported LUTS in cats seen urinating by the owner was 4.3%, 3.8% and 6.0%, with 95% confidence intervals of 3.2–5.7%, 2.5–5.7% and 3.4–10.5% at ages 18, 30 and 48 months, respectively. An indoor-only lifestyle at the age of 18 months and a change in diet between the ages of 12 and 18 months were identified as risk factors for owner-reported LUTS at the age of 18 months from the multivariable model. No clear type of change in diet was identified in our sample of cats with LUTS. 
Conclusions and relevance The prevalence of owner-reported LUTS in a cohort of young pet cats was higher than the previously reported prevalence of LUTS in cats presenting to veterinary hospitals for LUTS or other reasons. A novel risk factor of change in diet between 12 and 18 months of age warrants further investigation.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)609-618
Number of pages10
JournalJournal of Feline Medicine and Surgery
Volume19
Issue number6
Early online date21 Apr 2016
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jun 2017

Keywords

  • feline
  • cohort analysis
  • ownership
  • risk factors
  • epidemiology

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