Patient reported psychosocial functioning following successful ptosis surgery

H. S. Richards, E. Jenkinson, P. White, R. A. Harrad

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle (Academic Journal)peer-review

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Abstract

Background Ptosis may result in increased anxiety, appearance-related distress and social avoidance, and impacts visual function. Previous work demonstrates the benefits of ptosis surgery for health-related quality of life, but there is a paucity of research comparing such outcomes before and after surgery. The aim of this study was to determine potential patient benefits in health-related quality of life, social dysfunction and anxiety following successful ptosis surgery using validated measures. Methods Adult ptosis correction surgery patients completed validated measures of appearance-related social anxiety and avoidance, anxiety and depression, and fear of negative evaluation pre-surgery. Following successful surgery, these measures were repeated post-discharge in addition to another health-related quality of life measure. Results Of 61 patients recruited, follow-up measures were sent to 33 and completed by 23. Paired samples t-tests demonstrated positive significant changes in appearance-related social distress pre-op m = 30.94, post-op m = 23.67 (t(17) = 3.46, 95% CI 2.84–11.72, p = 0.003), anxiety pre-op m = 7.6, post-op m = 4.9 (t(19) = 4.27, 95% CI 1.38–4.02, p < 0.001) and fear of negative evaluation pre-op m = 34.79, post-op m = 31.26 (t(18) = 2.47, 95% CI 0.52–6.53, p = 0.024). There was no significant difference in depression scores pre-op m = 3.6; post-op m = 3.2 (t(19) = 0.672, 65% CL −0.85 to 1.65, p = 0.510). In total, 85% of patients reported positive benefit to well-being following surgery. Conclusion Increasingly, evidence suggests ptosis surgery may benefit patient’s well-being, appearance-related social anxiety and avoidance, as well as improving visual function. These psychosocial benefits should be considered alongside functional benefits in the provision of ptosis surgery.
Original languageEnglish
Number of pages5
JournalEye
Volume2021
Early online date29 Jul 2021
DOIs
Publication statusE-pub ahead of print - 29 Jul 2021

Keywords

  • health services
  • quality of life

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