Patterns of peroxidative ethane emission from submerged rice seedlings indicate that damage from reactive oxygen species takes place during submergence and is not necessarily a post-anoxic phenomenon

IE Santosa, PC Ram, EI Boamfa, LJJ Laarhoven, J Reuss, MB Jackson, FJM Harren

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle (Academic Journal)peer-review

46 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Using ethane as a marker for peroxidative damage to membranes by reactive oxygen species (ROS) we examined the injury of rice seedlings during submergence in the dark. It is often expressed that membrane injury from ROS is a post-submergence phenomenon occurring when oxygen is re-introduced after submergence-induced anoxia. We found that ethane production, from rice seedlings submerged for 24–72 h, was stimulated to 4–37 nl gFW−1, indicating underwater membrane peroxidation. When examined a week later the seedlings were damaged or had died. On de-submergence in air, ethane production rates rose sharply, but fell back to less than 0.1 nl gFW−1 h−1 after 2 h. We compared submergence-susceptible and submergence-tolerant cultivars, submergence starting in the morning (more damage) and in the afternoon (less damage) and investigated different submergence durations. The seedlings showed extensive fatality whenever total ethane emission exceeded about 15 nl gFW−1. Smaller amounts of ethane emission were linked to less extensive injury to leaves. Partial oxygen shortage (O2 levels
Translated title of the contributionPatterns of peroxidative ethane emission from submerged rice seedlings indicate that damage from reactive oxygen species takes place during submergence and is not necessarily a post-anoxic phenomenon
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)193 - 202
Number of pages10
JournalPLANTA
Volume226 (1)
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jun 2007

Bibliographical note

Publisher: Springer

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'Patterns of peroxidative ethane emission from submerged rice seedlings indicate that damage from reactive oxygen species takes place during submergence and is not necessarily a post-anoxic phenomenon'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this