Peer acceptance of children with language and communication impairments in a mainstream primary school: Associations with type of language difficulty, problem behaviours and a change of placement organisation

Glynis J Laws, Geraldine Bates, Maike Feuerstein, Emily Mason-Apps, Catherine White

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle (Academic Journal)peer-review

27 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

This research investigated peer acceptance of children with language and communication impairments attending a language resource base attached to a mainstream school. Compared to other children in their mainstream peer groups, peer acceptance was poor. Peer rejection was more common for children with profiles consistent with an autistic spectrum disorder than for children with specific language impairment, and peer acceptance was significantly associated with social communication abilities. Children with clearer speech and more mature syntax also had more positive peer relationships. Language and communication appeared to be more important for peer acceptance than classroom behaviour. Changing children’s principal placements from the language resource base to the mainstream classes had some beneficial effect; peer rejection was reduced and most children were more tolerated.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)73-86
Number of pages14
JournalChild Language Teaching and Therapy
Volume28
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2012

Keywords

  • peer acceptance
  • peer rejection
  • specific language impairment
  • autistic spectrum disorder
  • pragmatic language difficulties
  • problem behaviour

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