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Perception and barriers: reporting female genital mutilation

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Perception and barriers : reporting female genital mutilation. / Gangoli, Geetanjali; Gill, Aisha; Mulvihill, Natasha; Hester, Marianne.

In: Journal of Aggression, Conflict and Peace Research, 22.03.2018.

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Gangoli, Geetanjali ; Gill, Aisha ; Mulvihill, Natasha ; Hester, Marianne. / Perception and barriers : reporting female genital mutilation. In: Journal of Aggression, Conflict and Peace Research. 2018.

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@article{add629986b1b4dfeb284cb95e5a40636,
title = "Perception and barriers: reporting female genital mutilation",
abstract = "Purpose: This paper aims to explore the perceptions of and barriers to reporting female genital mutilation (FGM) by victims and survivors of female genital mutilation to the police in England and Wales. Research Design: The paper is based on 14 interviews conducted with adult survivors and victims of FGM. A combination of 1:1 and group interviews were used, based on the preference of the respondents. Respondents were recruited in collaboration with specialist non-governmental organisations and major stakeholders in the area of honour based violence and Black and Minority Ethnic Communities.Findings: A key finding in this research was that all victims/survivors we interviewed stated that they did not support the practice of FGM, and that they would not follow it for younger women in their own family. Secondly, we found that none of the respondents had reported their experience to the police. Thirdly, they identified key barriers to reporting, which included: their belief that reporting their own experience would not serve any purpose because they had experienced FGM as children, and in another country; and that they did not feel able to report new incidents of FGM in the community because of a lack of trust in the police due to previous negative experiences. Finally, they believed that FGM could be prevented only by work within the community, and not through engagement with the criminal justice system.Originality: This is, to our knowledge, one of the first papers that is based on victims and survivors’ perceptions that explores barriers to reporting cases of FGM to the police, and offers levers for change.",
keywords = "England and Wales, Experiences and perceptions, Female genital mutilation, Honour-based violence, Police, Victims/survivors",
author = "Geetanjali Gangoli and Aisha Gill and Natasha Mulvihill and Marianne Hester",
year = "2018",
month = "3",
day = "22",
doi = "10.1108/JACPR-09-2017-0323",
language = "English",
journal = "Journal of Aggression, Conflict and Peace Research",
issn = "1759-6599",
publisher = "Emerald",

}

RIS - suitable for import to EndNote

TY - JOUR

T1 - Perception and barriers

T2 - reporting female genital mutilation

AU - Gangoli, Geetanjali

AU - Gill, Aisha

AU - Mulvihill, Natasha

AU - Hester, Marianne

PY - 2018/3/22

Y1 - 2018/3/22

N2 - Purpose: This paper aims to explore the perceptions of and barriers to reporting female genital mutilation (FGM) by victims and survivors of female genital mutilation to the police in England and Wales. Research Design: The paper is based on 14 interviews conducted with adult survivors and victims of FGM. A combination of 1:1 and group interviews were used, based on the preference of the respondents. Respondents were recruited in collaboration with specialist non-governmental organisations and major stakeholders in the area of honour based violence and Black and Minority Ethnic Communities.Findings: A key finding in this research was that all victims/survivors we interviewed stated that they did not support the practice of FGM, and that they would not follow it for younger women in their own family. Secondly, we found that none of the respondents had reported their experience to the police. Thirdly, they identified key barriers to reporting, which included: their belief that reporting their own experience would not serve any purpose because they had experienced FGM as children, and in another country; and that they did not feel able to report new incidents of FGM in the community because of a lack of trust in the police due to previous negative experiences. Finally, they believed that FGM could be prevented only by work within the community, and not through engagement with the criminal justice system.Originality: This is, to our knowledge, one of the first papers that is based on victims and survivors’ perceptions that explores barriers to reporting cases of FGM to the police, and offers levers for change.

AB - Purpose: This paper aims to explore the perceptions of and barriers to reporting female genital mutilation (FGM) by victims and survivors of female genital mutilation to the police in England and Wales. Research Design: The paper is based on 14 interviews conducted with adult survivors and victims of FGM. A combination of 1:1 and group interviews were used, based on the preference of the respondents. Respondents were recruited in collaboration with specialist non-governmental organisations and major stakeholders in the area of honour based violence and Black and Minority Ethnic Communities.Findings: A key finding in this research was that all victims/survivors we interviewed stated that they did not support the practice of FGM, and that they would not follow it for younger women in their own family. Secondly, we found that none of the respondents had reported their experience to the police. Thirdly, they identified key barriers to reporting, which included: their belief that reporting their own experience would not serve any purpose because they had experienced FGM as children, and in another country; and that they did not feel able to report new incidents of FGM in the community because of a lack of trust in the police due to previous negative experiences. Finally, they believed that FGM could be prevented only by work within the community, and not through engagement with the criminal justice system.Originality: This is, to our knowledge, one of the first papers that is based on victims and survivors’ perceptions that explores barriers to reporting cases of FGM to the police, and offers levers for change.

KW - England and Wales

KW - Experiences and perceptions

KW - Female genital mutilation

KW - Honour-based violence

KW - Police

KW - Victims/survivors

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=85044266576&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1108/JACPR-09-2017-0323

DO - 10.1108/JACPR-09-2017-0323

M3 - Article

JO - Journal of Aggression, Conflict and Peace Research

JF - Journal of Aggression, Conflict and Peace Research

SN - 1759-6599

ER -