Phonological memory, attention control, and musical ability: effects of individual differences on rater judgments of second language speech

T Isaacs, P Trofimovich

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle (Academic Journal)peer-review

27 Citations (Scopus)
408 Downloads (Pure)

Abstract

This study examines how listener judgments of second language speech relate to individual differences in listeners’ phonological memory, attention control, and musical ability. Sixty native English listeners (30 music majors, 30 nonmusic majors) rated 40 nonnative speech samples for accentedness, comprehensibility, and fluency. The listeners were also assessed for phonological memory (serial recognition), attention control (trail making), and musical aptitude. Results showed that music majors assigned significantly lower scores than nonmusic majors solely for accentedness, particularly for low ability second language speakers. However, the ratings were not significantly affected by individual differences in listeners’ phonological memory and attention control, which implies that these factors do not bias listeners’ subjective judgments of speech. Implications for psycholinguistic research and for high-stakes speaking assessments are discussed.
Translated title of the contributionPhonological memory, attention control, and musical ability: Effects of individual differences on rater judgments of second language speech
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)113-140
Number of pages28
JournalApplied Psycholinguistics
Volume32
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jan 2011

Bibliographical note

Rose publication type: Article

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