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Phosphate stable oxygen isotope variability within a temperate agricultural soil

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

  • Steven J. Granger
  • Paul Harris
  • Sabine Peukert
  • Rongrong Guo
  • Federica Tamburini
  • Martin S A Blackwell
  • Nicholas J K Howden
  • Steve McGrath
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)64-75
Number of pages12
JournalGeoderma
Volume285
Early online date28 Sep 2016
DOIs
DateAccepted/In press - 21 Sep 2016
DateE-pub ahead of print - 28 Sep 2016
DatePublished (current) - 1 Jan 2017

Abstract

In this study, we conduct a spatial analysis of soil total phosphorus (TP), acid extractable phosphate (PO4) and the stable oxygen (O) isotope ratio within the PO4 molecule (δ18OPO4 ) from an intensively managed agricultural grassland site. Total P in the soil was found to range from 736 to 1952 mg P kg− 1, of which between 12 and 48% was extractable using a 1 M HCl (HClPO4 ) solution with the two variables exhibiting a strong positive correlation. The δ18OPO4 of the extracted PO4 ranged from 17.0 to 21.6‰ with a mean of 18.8‰ (± 0.8). While the spatial variability of Total P has been researched at various scales, this is the first study to assess the variability of soil δ18OPO4 at a field-scale resolution. We investigate whether or not δ18OPO4 variability has any significant relationship with: (i) itself with respect to spatial autocorrelation effects; and (ii) HClPO4 , elevation and slope - both globally and locally. Results indicate that δ18OPO4 was not spatially autocorrelated; and that δ18OPO4 was only weakly related to HClPO4 , elevation and slope, when considering the study field as a whole. Interestingly, the latter relationships appear to vary in strength locally. In particular, the δ18OPO4 to HClPO4 relationship may depend on the underlying soil class and/or on different field managements that had operated across an historical north-south field division of the study field, a division that had been removed four years prior to this study.

    Research areas

  • Phosphorus, Grassland, Spatial analysis, GW model, North Wyke farm platform

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    Rights statement: This is the final published version of the article (version of record). It first appeared online via Elsevier at http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0016706116304852. Please refer to any applicable terms of use of the publisher.

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    Licence: CC BY

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