'Places for Thinking' from Annapolis to Bristol: Situations and Symmetries in 'World Historical Archaeologies'

D Hicks

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle (Academic Journal)peer-review

Abstract

The past decade has seen many calls for the development of unified 'world historical archaeologies' of the past 500 years. While the field benefits from growing international exchanges and collaborations, retaining the diversity of regional traditions is a major and emerging challenge. As the field increasingly tests the temporal, geographical and interdisciplinary limits of archaeological perspectives, engaging with the diversity of modern material, these complexities remain little discussed, and the situations and contingencies of disciplinary narratives, priorities and interactions remain unproblematized. Exploring these matters, this paper considers transatlantic interactions between British and North American traditions of historical archaeology over the past two decades, journeying between two garden landscapes in Annapolis and Bristol. After considering Mark Leone's 1984 study of the William Paca garden in Annapolis, Maryland, and its subsequent reinterpretations, the paper discusses an eighteenth-century 'eclectic' garden at Goldney in Bristol. The paper argues that situational and 'symmetrical', rather than interpretative, approaches to archaeological material would aid the development of multi-vocal and inclusive world historical archaeologies', acknowledging and celebrating the archaeological complexities that are encountered in the past and the disciplinary present.
Translated title of the contribution'Places for Thinking' from Annapolis to Bristol: Situations and Symmetries in 'World Historical Archaeologies'
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)373 - 391
Number of pages18
JournalWorld Archaeology
Volume37(3)
Publication statusPublished - 2005

Fingerprint

Dive into the research topics of ''Places for Thinking' from Annapolis to Bristol: Situations and Symmetries in 'World Historical Archaeologies''. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this