Pneumococcal serotype-specific antibodies persist through early childhood after infant immunization: follow-up from a randomized controlled trial

Johannes Trück, Matthew D Snape, Florencia Tatangeli, Merryn Voysey, Ly-Mee Yu, Saul N Faust, Paul T Heath, Adam Finn, Andrew Pollard

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle (Academic Journal)

10 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

BACKGROUND: In a previous UK multi-center randomized study 278 children received three doses of 7-valent (PCV-7) or 13-valent (PCV-13) pneumococcal conjugate vaccine at 2, 4 and 12 months of age. At 13 months of age, most of these children had pneumococcal serotype-specific IgG concentrations ≥ 0.35 µg/ml and opsonophagocytic assay (OPA) titers ≥ 8.

METHODS: Children who had participated in the original study were enrolled again at 3.5 years of age. Persistence of immunity following infant immunization with either PCV-7 or PCV-13 and the immune response to a PCV-13 booster at pre-school age were investigated.

RESULTS: In total, 108 children were followed-up to the age of 3.5 years and received a PCV-13 booster at this age. At least 76% of children who received PCV-7 or PCV-13 in infancy retained serotype-specific IgG concentrations ≥ 0.35 µg/ml against each of 5/7 shared serotypes. For serotypes 4 and 18C, persistence was lower at 22-42%. At least 71% of PCV-13 group participants had IgG concentrations ≥ 0.35 µg/ml against each of 4/6 of the additional PCV-13 serotypes; for serotypes 1 and 3 this proportion was 45% and 52%. In the PCV-7 group these percentages were significantly lower for serotypes 1, 5 and 7F. A pre-school PCV-13 booster was highly immunogenic and resulted in low rates of local and systemic adverse effects.

CONCLUSION: Despite some decline in antibody from 13 months of age, these data suggest that a majority of pre-school children maintain protective serotype-specific antibody concentrations following conjugate vaccination at 2, 4 and 12 months of age.

TRIAL REGISTRATION: ClinicalTrials.gov NCT01095471.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)e91413
JournalPLoS ONE
Volume9
Issue number3
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 11 Mar 2014

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