Polysaccharide-protein conjugate vaccination induces antibody production but not sustained B-cell memory in the human nasopharyngeal mucosa

E T Clarke, N A Williams, P M Dull, J Findlow, R Borrow, A Finn, R S Heyderman

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle (Academic Journal)peer-review

14 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Colonization of the nasopharyngeal mucosa by meningococcus and other polysaccharide (PS)-encapsulated bacteria precedes invasion. PS-conjugate vaccines induce PS-specific B-cell memory (B(MEM)) and also prevent colonization, thus blocking person-to-person transmission, generating herd protection. However, in isolation the B(MEM) are unable to sustain immunity. Furthermore, the duration of herd protection the vaccines induce appears limited. We demonstrate that, despite the persistence of PS-specific B(MEM), the population is not maintained within the nasopharynx. Although booster immunization results in the transient appearance of PS-specific B(MEM) within the mucosa, this reflects the re-circulation of systemic B(MEM) through the site rather than the generation of resident mucosal B(MEM). The induction of sustained PS-specific B(MEM) in the nasopharynx would allow the population to be activated by colonization, thus inhibiting subsequent invasion. It would also be expected to boost local mucosal immunity, thus extending herd protection. Strategies to generate PS-specific B(MEM) in the mucosa warrant further investigation.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)288-96
Number of pages9
JournalMucosal Immunology
Volume6
Issue number2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Mar 2013

Keywords

  • Adolescent
  • Adult
  • Antibodies, Bacterial
  • B-Lymphocytes
  • Bacterial Vaccines
  • Humans
  • Immunity, Mucosal
  • Immunization
  • Immunization, Secondary
  • Immunologic Memory
  • Laryngeal Mucosa
  • Lymphoid Tissue
  • Nasal Mucosa
  • Nasopharynx
  • Palatine Tonsil
  • Polysaccharides, Bacterial
  • Proteins
  • Saliva
  • Vaccines, Conjugate
  • Young Adult

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'Polysaccharide-protein conjugate vaccination induces antibody production but not sustained B-cell memory in the human nasopharyngeal mucosa'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this