Pontomedullary transection attenuates central respiratory modulation of sympathetic discharge, heart rate and the baroreceptor reflex in the in situ rat preparation

D Beakey, T E Dick, JFR Paton

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle (Academic Journal)

54 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Previous studies have indicated a major role for the pons in the genesis of the respiratory pattern. The respiratory rhythm is coupled to the cardiovascular system to ensure optimal matching of minute ventilation and cardiac output. Since much of this coupling results from cross-talk between brainstem circuits, we have assessed the role of the pons in both the co-ordination of respiratory and cardiovascular efferent activities and the baroreceptor reflex efficacy. Using the arterially perfused in situ rat preparation, we recorded neural activities from the left phrenic nerve, central end of the vagus nerve, thoracic sympathetic chain (T8-T10) and heart rate. Respiratory sinus arrhythmia, respiratory modulation of sympathetic nerve activity (and Traube-Hering waves in arterial pressure) and postinspiratory discharges recorded from vagal efferents were eliminated after pontine transection. We also found that although the sympathetic arterial baroreflex remained intact, respiratory gating of the baroreceptor reflex (i.e. both bradycardia and sympathoinhibition) was abolished after pontine removal. We propose that neural activity of the pons is essential for physiological coupling of centrally generated respiratory and cardiovascular efferent activities.
Translated title of the contributionPontomedullary transection attenuates central respiratory modulation of sympathetic discharge, heart rate and the baroreceptor reflex in the in situ rat preparation
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)803 - 816
Number of pages14
JournalExperimental Physiology
Volume93
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jul 2008

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