Postural stability during standing balance and sit-To-stand in master athlete runners compared with nonathletic old and young adults

Daniel Leightley*, Moi Hoon Yap, Jessica Coulson, Mathew Piasecki, James Cameron, Yoann Barnouin, Jon Tobias, Jamie S. McPhee

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle (Academic Journal)peer-review

11 Citations (Scopus)
222 Downloads (Pure)

Abstract

The aim of this study was to compare postural sway during a series of static balancing tasks and during five chair rises between healthy young (mean [SEM], age 26 [1] years), healthy old (age 67 [1] years) and master athlete runners (age 67 [1] years; competing and training for the previous 51 [5] years) using the Microsoft Kinect One. The healthy old had more sway than the healthy young in all balance tasks. The master athletes had similar sway to young athletes during two-leg balancing and one-leg standing with eyes open. When balancing on one leg with eyes closed, both the healthy old and the master athletes had around 17-fold more sway than the young athletes. The healthy old and master athletes also had less anterio-posterior movement during chair rising compared with young athletes. These results suggest that masters runners are not spared from the age-Associated decline in postural stability and may benefit from specific balance training.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)345-350
Number of pages6
JournalJournal of Aging and Physical Activity
Volume25
Issue number3
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Jul 2017

Keywords

  • Aging
  • Frailty
  • Masters athlete
  • Mobility
  • Sarcopenia

Fingerprint

Dive into the research topics of 'Postural stability during standing balance and sit-To-stand in master athlete runners compared with nonathletic old and young adults'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this