Predictors of length of stay following shoulder arthroplasty in a high-volume UK centre

Peter J Dacombe, Luke Harries, P McCann, Mark Crowther, I Packham, P Sarangi, M R Whitehouse

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle (Academic Journal)peer-review

Abstract

INTRODUCTION: Shoulder arthroplasty rates are increasing in the UK. No data have been published from a UK centre on predictors of length of inpatient stay following shoulder arthroplasty. This study analyses the length of inpatient stay following shoulder arthroplasty in a high-volume UK centre and identifies predictors of prolonged inpatient stay.

MATERIALS AND METHODS: All shoulder arthroplasty cases performed between 2012 and 2018 were identified. A review of case notes and electronic patient records was completed to identify demographic data, Charlson comorbidity score, length of inpatient stay and factors associated with length of stay. Multiple linear regression analysis was conducted to determine which factors were independently associated with length of inpatient stay.

RESULTS: A total of 640 shoulder arthroplasty cases were performed in 566 patients. Median length of stay was two days. Length of stay was predicted by age, sex, chronic kidney disease, congestive cardiac failure, previous myocardial infarction, intraoperative complication and postoperative transfusion.

DISCUSSION: Increasing age, female sex, chronic kidney disease, congestive cardiac failure, previous myocardial infarction, intraoperative complication and transfusion were independent predictors of increased length of stay. Strategies to reduce perioperative complication and transfusion, and to optimise renal and cardiac comorbidities may reduce overall length of stay for shoulder arthroplasty patients.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1-6
Number of pages6
JournalAnnals of the Royal College of Surgeons of England
Early online date17 Apr 2020
DOIs
Publication statusE-pub ahead of print - 17 Apr 2020

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