Private and public voices: Does family group conferencing privilege the voices of children and families in child welfare?

Marie Connolly, Judith Masson

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle (Academic Journal)peer-review

Abstract

This article examines the use of family group conferencing in child protection and considers its ability to privilege the voice of children and families who reach the attention of statutory child protection services. The family group conference (FGC) is a process of family decision-making in child protection, originally developed in Aotearoa New Zealand, and now practiced in many countries including the UK. Examining the literature and research relating to the FGC it considers whether the approach provides a genuine context of participation and partnership, or whether it has become an instrumental professionally-led practice as families are charged with greater responsibilities for children at risk.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)403-414
Number of pages11
JournalJournal of Social Welfare and Family Law
Early online date14 Nov 2014
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Dec 2014

Keywords

  • family group conference
  • children's rights
  • family engagement

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