Promoting Evidence-based Veterinary Medicine through the online resource ‘EBVM Learning’: User feedback

Ellie R Sellers, S Baillie*, Rachel Dean, Sheena M Warman, Heidi Janicke, Sebastian Arlt, Clare Boulton, Marnie Brennan, David Brodbelt, Fiona Brown, Louise Buckley, Myai Du, Emma Gallop, George Goran, Douglas Grindley, Laura A Haddock, Jo Ireland, Catherine McGowan, Heather Moberly, Emma J PlaceMd Mizanur Rahman, Gwen Rees, Kristen K Reyher, Javier Sanchez, Johan Schoeman, Laura Urdes, John vanLeeuwen, Kristien Verheyen

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle (Academic Journal)peer-review

Abstract

‘EBVM Learning’ is a freely available resource (http://www.ebvmlearning.org/) created in 2015 by an international team with the support of RCVS Knowledge. The resource comprises a series of online modules teaching the fundamental concepts of evidence-based veterinary medicine (Ask, Acquire, Appraise, Apply & Assess) supported by case-studies, exercises, worked examples and quizzes. The aim of the current study (undertaken in 2019) was to review ‘EBVM Learning’ to ensure its ongoing relevance and usefulness to the range of learners engaged in EBVM. Feedback was gathered from stakeholder groups using website statistics and feedback forms, a survey and semi-structured interviews to provide a combination of quantitative and qualitative data. Website statistics revealed an international audience and a steady increase in visitors exceeding 1,000 per month in August 2020.. Feedback via the online form (n=35) and survey (n=71) indicated that the resource was well structured, with an appropriate level and amount of content, useful examples and quizzes and the majority of respondents would use it again. Semi-structured interviews of educators (n=5) and veterinarians (n=8) identified three themes: features of the ‘EBVM Learning’ resource (strengths, suggestions for improvement), embedding the resource in education (undergraduate, postgraduate) and promoting EBVM (challenges, motivation for engagement). At a project team workshop the results were used to plan updates to the existing content and to identify new ways to promote learning and engagement. An updated version of ‘EBVM Learning’ was developed. ‘EBVM Learning’ is helping to produce the next generation of evidence-based practitioners and enabling veterinarians to engage in the concepts of EBVM as part of their clinical practice.
Original languageEnglish
JournalVeterinary Evidence
Publication statusAccepted/In press - 1 Feb 2021

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