Promoting Student Learning using Facilitative Teaching Methods in Anatomy: New Horizons in Professional Education conference, University of Bristol (19 November 2014)

Charles Dibor, Felicity Allen, Liz Gaze, Sarah Allsop

Research output: Contribution to conferenceConference Poster

Abstract

Traditionally anatomy has been taught either by supervised dissection or by didactic lecture. Neither of these methods alone offers the best learning environment for the student, and in a modern medical curriculum there is a balance between the amount of material delivered and the time available. Learning at university requires a high level of responsibility in one’s own learning. Facilitative teaching methods have been shown to improve students’ engagement in learning and retention of knowledge. Promotion of lifelong learning skills is also a key principle outlined by the GMC review process.
In anatomy, we have changed our practical sessions to a facilitative style to promote independent learning. Sessions are run over 3h interspersed with short overviews, after which the students work in directed groups on their learning outcomes. Staff are available to support and help where needed. In the early stages, we often see reluctance to this style of learning. However, over time the students come to appreciate this learning style, as they feel they learn more and push themselves harder. This early exposure to supported self-directed learning is important for the transition into university and promoting learning skills which can be taken forward into the clinical years.
Original languageEnglish
Publication statusUnpublished - 19 Nov 2014

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