Psychoeducation and Problem Solving (PEPS) Therapy for Adults With Personality Disorder: A Pragmatic Randomized-Controlled Trial

Mary McMurran, Florence Day, Joseph Reilly, Juan Delport, Paul McCrone, Diane Whitham, Wei Tan, Conor Duggan, Alan A Montgomery, Hywel C Williams, Clive E Adams, Huajie Jin, Paul Moran, Mike J Crawford

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle (Academic Journal)peer-review

5 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

We compared psychoeducation and problem solving (PEPS) therapy against usual treatment in a multisite randomized-controlled trial. The primary outcome was social functioning. We aimed to recruit 444 community-dwelling adults with personality disorder; however, safety concerns led to an early cessation of recruitment. A total of 154 people were randomized to PEPS and 152 to usual treatment. Follow-up at 72 weeks was completed for 68%. PEPS therapy was no more effective than usual treatment for improving social functioning (adjusted difference in mean Social Functioning Questionnaire scores = -0.73; 95% CI [-1.83, 0.38]; p = 0.19). PEPS therapy is not an effective treatment for improving social functioning of adults with personality disorder living in the community.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)810-826
Number of pages17
JournalJournal of Personality Disorders
Volume31
Issue number6
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 17 May 2017

Keywords

  • Adult
  • Female
  • Humans
  • Male
  • Personality Disorders/therapy
  • Pilot Projects
  • Problem Solving/physiology
  • Psychotherapy/methods
  • Treatment Outcome

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