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Recent patterns and mechanisms of carbon exchange by terrestrial ecosystems

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Recent patterns and mechanisms of carbon exchange by terrestrial ecosystems. / Schimel, DS; House, JI; Hibbard, KA; Bousquet, P; Ciais, P; Peylin, P; Braswell, BH; Apps, MJ; Baker, D; Bondeau, A; Canadell, J; Churkina, G; Cramer, W; Denning, AS; Field, CB; Friedlingstein, P; Goodale, C; Heimann, M; Houghton, RA; Melillo, JM; Moore, B; Murdiyarso, D; Noble, MA; Pacala, SW; Prentice, IC; Raupach, MR; Rayner, PJ; Scholes, RJ; Steffen, WL; Wirth, C.

In: Nature, Vol. 414, No. 6860, 08.11.2001, p. 169-172.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Harvard

Schimel, DS, House, JI, Hibbard, KA, Bousquet, P, Ciais, P, Peylin, P, Braswell, BH, Apps, MJ, Baker, D, Bondeau, A, Canadell, J, Churkina, G, Cramer, W, Denning, AS, Field, CB, Friedlingstein, P, Goodale, C, Heimann, M, Houghton, RA, Melillo, JM, Moore, B, Murdiyarso, D, Noble, MA, Pacala, SW, Prentice, IC, Raupach, MR, Rayner, PJ, Scholes, RJ, Steffen, WL & Wirth, C 2001, 'Recent patterns and mechanisms of carbon exchange by terrestrial ecosystems', Nature, vol. 414, no. 6860, pp. 169-172. https://doi.org/10.1038/35102500

APA

Schimel, DS., House, JI., Hibbard, KA., Bousquet, P., Ciais, P., Peylin, P., ... Wirth, C. (2001). Recent patterns and mechanisms of carbon exchange by terrestrial ecosystems. Nature, 414(6860), 169-172. https://doi.org/10.1038/35102500

Vancouver

Schimel DS, House JI, Hibbard KA, Bousquet P, Ciais P, Peylin P et al. Recent patterns and mechanisms of carbon exchange by terrestrial ecosystems. Nature. 2001 Nov 8;414(6860):169-172. https://doi.org/10.1038/35102500

Author

Schimel, DS ; House, JI ; Hibbard, KA ; Bousquet, P ; Ciais, P ; Peylin, P ; Braswell, BH ; Apps, MJ ; Baker, D ; Bondeau, A ; Canadell, J ; Churkina, G ; Cramer, W ; Denning, AS ; Field, CB ; Friedlingstein, P ; Goodale, C ; Heimann, M ; Houghton, RA ; Melillo, JM ; Moore, B ; Murdiyarso, D ; Noble, MA ; Pacala, SW ; Prentice, IC ; Raupach, MR ; Rayner, PJ ; Scholes, RJ ; Steffen, WL ; Wirth, C. / Recent patterns and mechanisms of carbon exchange by terrestrial ecosystems. In: Nature. 2001 ; Vol. 414, No. 6860. pp. 169-172.

Bibtex

@article{95a4dfdb2ac847fa833deb98d2520455,
title = "Recent patterns and mechanisms of carbon exchange by terrestrial ecosystems",
abstract = "Knowledge of carbon exchange between the atmosphere, land and the oceans is important, given that the terrestrial and marine environments are currently absorbing about half of the carbon dioxide that is emitted by fossil-fuel combustion. This carbon uptake is therefore limiting the extent of atmospheric and climatic change, but its long-term nature remains uncertain. Here we provide an overview of the current state of knowledge of global and regional patterns of carbon exchange by terrestrial ecosystems. Atmospheric carbon dioxide and oxygen data confirm that the terrestrial biosphere was largely neutral with respect to net carbon exchange during the 1980s, but became a net carbon sink in the 1990s. This recent sink can be largely attributed to northern extratropical areas, and is roughly split between North America and Eurasia. Tropical land areas, however, were approximately in balance with respect to carbon exchange, implying a carbon sink that offset emissions due to tropical deforestation. The evolution of the terrestrial carbon sink is largely the result of changes in land use over time, such as regrowth on abandoned agricultural land and fire prevention, in addition to responses to environmental changes, such as longer growing seasons, and fertilization by carbon dioxide and nitrogen. Nevertheless, there remain considerable uncertainties as to the magnitude of the sink in different regions and the contribution of different processes.",
keywords = "ATMOSPHERIC CO2, INTERANNUAL VARIABILITY, DIOXIDE, FLUXES, MODELS, LAND, TEMPERATURE, BIOMASS, FORESTS, BUDGET",
author = "DS Schimel and JI House and KA Hibbard and P Bousquet and P Ciais and P Peylin and BH Braswell and MJ Apps and D Baker and A Bondeau and J Canadell and G Churkina and W Cramer and AS Denning and CB Field and P Friedlingstein and C Goodale and M Heimann and RA Houghton and JM Melillo and B Moore and D Murdiyarso and MA Noble and SW Pacala and IC Prentice and MR Raupach and PJ Rayner and RJ Scholes and WL Steffen and C Wirth",
note = "Publisher: Nature Publishing Group",
year = "2001",
month = "11",
day = "8",
doi = "10.1038/35102500",
language = "English",
volume = "414",
pages = "169--172",
journal = "Nature",
issn = "0028-0836",
publisher = "Springer Nature",
number = "6860",

}

RIS - suitable for import to EndNote

TY - JOUR

T1 - Recent patterns and mechanisms of carbon exchange by terrestrial ecosystems

AU - Schimel, DS

AU - House, JI

AU - Hibbard, KA

AU - Bousquet, P

AU - Ciais, P

AU - Peylin, P

AU - Braswell, BH

AU - Apps, MJ

AU - Baker, D

AU - Bondeau, A

AU - Canadell, J

AU - Churkina, G

AU - Cramer, W

AU - Denning, AS

AU - Field, CB

AU - Friedlingstein, P

AU - Goodale, C

AU - Heimann, M

AU - Houghton, RA

AU - Melillo, JM

AU - Moore, B

AU - Murdiyarso, D

AU - Noble, MA

AU - Pacala, SW

AU - Prentice, IC

AU - Raupach, MR

AU - Rayner, PJ

AU - Scholes, RJ

AU - Steffen, WL

AU - Wirth, C

N1 - Publisher: Nature Publishing Group

PY - 2001/11/8

Y1 - 2001/11/8

N2 - Knowledge of carbon exchange between the atmosphere, land and the oceans is important, given that the terrestrial and marine environments are currently absorbing about half of the carbon dioxide that is emitted by fossil-fuel combustion. This carbon uptake is therefore limiting the extent of atmospheric and climatic change, but its long-term nature remains uncertain. Here we provide an overview of the current state of knowledge of global and regional patterns of carbon exchange by terrestrial ecosystems. Atmospheric carbon dioxide and oxygen data confirm that the terrestrial biosphere was largely neutral with respect to net carbon exchange during the 1980s, but became a net carbon sink in the 1990s. This recent sink can be largely attributed to northern extratropical areas, and is roughly split between North America and Eurasia. Tropical land areas, however, were approximately in balance with respect to carbon exchange, implying a carbon sink that offset emissions due to tropical deforestation. The evolution of the terrestrial carbon sink is largely the result of changes in land use over time, such as regrowth on abandoned agricultural land and fire prevention, in addition to responses to environmental changes, such as longer growing seasons, and fertilization by carbon dioxide and nitrogen. Nevertheless, there remain considerable uncertainties as to the magnitude of the sink in different regions and the contribution of different processes.

AB - Knowledge of carbon exchange between the atmosphere, land and the oceans is important, given that the terrestrial and marine environments are currently absorbing about half of the carbon dioxide that is emitted by fossil-fuel combustion. This carbon uptake is therefore limiting the extent of atmospheric and climatic change, but its long-term nature remains uncertain. Here we provide an overview of the current state of knowledge of global and regional patterns of carbon exchange by terrestrial ecosystems. Atmospheric carbon dioxide and oxygen data confirm that the terrestrial biosphere was largely neutral with respect to net carbon exchange during the 1980s, but became a net carbon sink in the 1990s. This recent sink can be largely attributed to northern extratropical areas, and is roughly split between North America and Eurasia. Tropical land areas, however, were approximately in balance with respect to carbon exchange, implying a carbon sink that offset emissions due to tropical deforestation. The evolution of the terrestrial carbon sink is largely the result of changes in land use over time, such as regrowth on abandoned agricultural land and fire prevention, in addition to responses to environmental changes, such as longer growing seasons, and fertilization by carbon dioxide and nitrogen. Nevertheless, there remain considerable uncertainties as to the magnitude of the sink in different regions and the contribution of different processes.

KW - ATMOSPHERIC CO2

KW - INTERANNUAL VARIABILITY

KW - DIOXIDE

KW - FLUXES

KW - MODELS

KW - LAND

KW - TEMPERATURE

KW - BIOMASS

KW - FORESTS

KW - BUDGET

U2 - 10.1038/35102500

DO - 10.1038/35102500

M3 - Article

VL - 414

SP - 169

EP - 172

JO - Nature

JF - Nature

SN - 0028-0836

IS - 6860

ER -