Regulation of naturally acquired mucosal immunity to Streptococcus pneumoniae in healthy Malawian adults and children

Sarah J Glennie, Dominic Banda, Wakisa Mulwafu, Rose Nkhata, Neil A Williams, Robert S Heyderman

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle (Academic Journal)peer-review

3 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Worldwide, invasive pneumococcal disease caused by Streptococcus pneumoniae is most common in young children. In adults, disease rates decline following intermittent colonization and the acquisition of naturally acquired immunity. We characterized mucosal and systemic pneumococcal-specific T-cell responses in African children and adults who contend with intense rates of colonization, up to 100% and 60% respectively. We find most Malawian children have high pneumococcal-specific T-cell responses in tonsil tissue and peripheral blood. In addition, frequent commensalism generates CD25(hi) (Tregs) which modulate mucosal pneumococcal-specific T-cell responses in some children and ≥50% of adults. We propose that immune regulation may prolong pneumococcal colonization and predispose vulnerable individuals to disease.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)e51425
JournalPLoS ONE
Volume7
Issue number12
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2012

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