Religious Activity and Transitions in Functional Health and Mortality among Middle Aged and Older Adults in Taiwan

Mira M Hidajat, Zachary Zimmer, Baai-Shyun Hurng

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter in a book

Abstract

Policy-makers often treat the ageing population as if it is homogenous. Recent and rapidly accelerating societal changes associated with globalization and changing cultural norms are having a profound impact on inter-generational relations and the nature of flows between generations. Downward financial flows serve to increase inequality between social groups in society. Despite the cultural and economic differences between societies, there is a remarkable consistency in the proportions of older men who are married and of women who are widowed. This gender asymmetry in marriage ages is very stark in many countries. Inter-generational relations and transfers tend to occur in a 'natural' way. It is obvious that young children need care and emotional support. Societal, cultural and economic changes globally mean that the nature of intergenerational relations is changing with consequences for elders. Marital status has a critical impact on older people's need for care and support from relatives or others living outside their household.
Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationGlobal Ageing in the Twenty-First Century: Challenges, Opportunities and Implications
EditorsZachary Zimmer, Susan McDaniel
Place of PublicationLondon
PublisherRoutledge
Chapter5
Pages105-119
Edition1st
ISBN (Electronic)9781315584720
Publication statusPublished - 2013

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