Repeated application of 4-aminopyridine provoke an increase in entorhinal cortex excitability and rearrange AMPA and kainate receptors

Sandor Borbely, Dávid Czege, Elek Molnar, Endre Dobo, Andras Mihaly, Ildiko Vilagi

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle (Academic Journal)peer-review

7 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Entorhinal cortex is a highly epilepsy-prone brain region. Effects of repetitive seizures on ionotropic glutamate receptors (iGluRs) were investigated in rat entorhinal cortex slices. Seizures were induced by daily administration of 4-aminopyridine (4-AP). Electrophysiological, pharmacological and histological investigations were carried out to determine changes in synaptic efficacy and in sensitivity of iGluRs due to recurring seizures. Repeated 4-AP-induced seizures increased the amplitude of evoked synaptic field responses in rat entorhinal cortical slices. While vulnerability to inhibition of AMPA receptors by the specific antagonist GYKI 52466 was slightly reduced, responsiveness to NMDA receptor antagonist APV remained unaffected. Testing of bivalent cation permeability of iGluRs revealed reduced Ca(2+)-influx through non-NMDA receptors. According to the semi-quantitative histoblot analysis GluA1-4, GluA1, GluA2, GluK5, GluN1 and GluN2A subunit protein expression differently altered. While there was a marked decrease in the level of GluA1-4, GluA2 and GluK5 receptor subunits, GluA1 and GluN2A protein levels moderately increased. The results indicate that brief convulsions, repeated daily for 10 days can increase overall entorhinal cortex excitability despite a reduction in AMPA/kainate receptor activity, probably through the alteration of local network susceptibility.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)441-452
Number of pages12
JournalNeurotoxicity Research
Volume27
Issue number4
Early online date10 Jan 2015
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - May 2015

Keywords

  • seizure
  • brain slice
  • 4-aminopyridine
  • entorhinal cortex
  • glutamate receptor

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