Research frontiers in the chemistry of Criegee intermediates and tropospheric ozonolysis

Craig A. Taatjes*, Dudley E. Shallcross, Carl J. Percival

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle (Academic Journal)

149 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The chemistry of carbonyl oxides, known as Criegee intermediates, is central to many aspects of tropospheric chemistry. For decades it has been known that these reactive species, whose electronic structure contains zwitterionic and biradical character, are formed in the ozonolysis of alkenes. However it is only recently that direct measurements of their reaction kinetics have become possible. In this perspective we describe the most recent progress in understanding the reactivity of these historically elusive molecules, explore the atmospheric chemistry implications of new experimental discoveries, and propose important new areas for investigation.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1704-1718
Number of pages15
JournalPhysical Chemistry Chemical Physics
Volume16
Issue number5
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2014

Keywords

  • GAS-PHASE OZONOLYSIS
  • URBAN ATMOSPHERIC CHEMISTRY
  • ABSORPTION CROSS-SECTIONS
  • CARBONYL OXIDE
  • SULFUR-DIOXIDE
  • RATE CONSTANTS
  • REACTION-MECHANISM
  • MASS-SPECTROMETRY
  • HUMID CONDITIONS
  • CH2I RADICALS

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