Resistance determinants in strains of Clostridium difficile from two geographically distinct populations

JS Bendle, PA James, PM Bennett, MB Avison, AP MacGowan, KM Al-Shafi

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle (Academic Journal)

17 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Ninety-three clinical isolates of Clostridium difficile, comprising 65 from Royal Gwent Hospital, Newport and 28 from Southmead Hospital, Bristol were examined to determine the prevalence of genes coding for macrolide resistance and to explore differences in susceptibility patterns. Antibiogram testing produced similar results for both sets of strains with respect to amoxicillin, tetracycline, erythromycin and cefotaxime. Results differed for rifampicin, where 53% of the Bristol isolates were resistant, compared with 3% of the Newport isolates. Clindamycin disc susceptibility testing produced similar resistance rates. However, clindamycin MIC determinations revealed that 53% of the Bristol strains exhibited high-level resistance (MIC > 256 mg/L), whereas strains from Newport had clindamycin MICs ranging from 0.25 to 3mg/L. erm (B) was present in 15 of the strains from Bristol and in none of the Newport strains. erm (F) and erm (Q) were not detected in either population. The two geographically distinct populations of C. difficile differed considerably in their susceptibility to antibiotics. The possibility that C. difficile may serve as a conservator for resistant determinants subsequent to exposure to antimicrobial agents, has important implications for infection control.
Translated title of the contributionResistance determinants in strains of Clostridium difficile from two geographically distinct populations
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)619 - 621
Number of pages3
JournalInternational Journal of Antimicrobial Agents
Volume24
Publication statusPublished - Dec 2004

Bibliographical note

Publisher: Elsevier

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