Response suppression contributes to recency in serial recall

Simon Farrell*, Stephan Lewandowsky

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle (Academic Journal)peer-review

15 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Serial recall is often assumed to involve response suppression: the removal or inhibition of items already recalled so that they are not recalled again. Evidence for response suppression includes repetition inhibition and the separation of erroneous repetitions. Some theorists have suggested that response suppression, by eliminating competing responses, also contributes to recency in forward serial recall. We present experiments in which performance on the final item was examined as a function of whether or not the preceding retrievals entailed suppression of potential response competitors. In line with the predictions of response suppression, recency was found to be reduced when the earlier recall errors consisted of intrusion errors (which leave list items unsuppressed) rather than transposition errors (which involve suppression).

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1070-1080
Number of pages11
JournalMemory and Cognition
Volume40
Issue number7
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Oct 2012

Structured keywords

  • Memory

Keywords

  • Short-term memory
  • SHORT-TERM-MEMORY
  • TIME
  • CONSTRAINTS
  • Working memory
  • WORKING-MEMORY
  • ORDER MEMORY
  • Inhibition
  • PHONOLOGICAL SIMILARITY
  • Recall
  • INDIVIDUAL-DIFFERENCES
  • NETWORK MODEL
  • WORD-LENGTH
  • INTERFERENCE

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