Review article: steroid resistance in inflammatory bowel disease - mechnisms and therapeutic strategies

TJ Creed, C Probert

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle (Academic Journal)peer-review

Abstract

BACKGROUND: Steroid resistance in inflammatory bowel disease presents a difficult clinical challenge. The advent of biological therapies coupled with an increasing understanding of the pathogenesis of inflammatory bowel disease has provided new therapeutic options. METHODS: We review the available literature of the mechanisms behind steroid resistance. In addition, we outline some of the options available for treating those patients who fail to respond adequately to glucocorticoids. RESULTS: Approximately 30% of patients prescribed glucocorticoids will not achieve clinical remission. Many such patients are offered immunosuppressive or, recently, biological agents. However, these agents are ineffective in a large proportion of patients. Immunosuppressive agents only bring 40-60% of patients into remission, and biological agents typically induce remission in just 40% of patients. In this review, the possible explanations for glucocorticoid resistance are discussed. Recent evidence suggests that in many patients it is mediated by interleukin-2. Basiliximab, a biological agent that interrupts interleukin-2 signalling, has shown significant benefit in early clinical studies. CONCLUSIONS: Patients who fail to respond to steroid therapy should have alternative agents introduced in a timely fashion. Steroid refractory inflammatory bowel disease remains a difficult condition to treat, but new therapies and managements are emerging.
Translated title of the contributionReview article: steroid resistance in inflammatory bowel disease - mechnisms and therapeutic strategies
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)111 - 122
Number of pages12
JournalAliment Pharmacol Ther
Volume15;25(2)
Publication statusPublished - Jan 2007

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