Same, same but different? Cognitive behavioural treatment approaches for paediatric CFS/ME and depression

M E Loades, T Chalder

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle (Academic Journal)peer-review

311 Downloads (Pure)

Abstract

BACKGROUND: Approximately one in three children and young people with chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS/ME) also have probable depression. Cognitive behaviour therapy (CBT) has a growing evidence base as an effective treatment approach for CFS/ME and for depression in this population.

AIMS: Given the high degree of co-morbidity, this discussion paper aims to compare and contrast CBT for CFS/ME and CBT for depression in children and young people.

METHOD: The existing literature on CBT for depression and CBT for CFS/ME, in relation to children and young people was reviewed.

RESULTS: Whilst there are commonalities to both treatments, the cognitive behavioural model of CFS/ME maintenance includes different factors and has a different emphasis to the cognitive behavioural model of depression, resulting in different intervention targets and strategies in a different sequence.

CONCLUSIONS: A collaborative, formulation-driven approach to intervention should inform the intervention targets and treatment strategies.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)366-381
Number of pages16
JournalBehavioural and Cognitive Psychotherapy
Volume45
Early online date9 Mar 2017
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Jul 2017

Keywords

  • CBT
  • CFS/ME
  • Depression
  • Mood
  • Paediatric

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'Same, same but different? Cognitive behavioural treatment approaches for paediatric CFS/ME and depression'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this