Screening to identify postoperative pain and cross-sectional associations between factors identified in this process with pain and function, three months after total knee replacement

Vikki Wylde, Emily Sanderson, Tim J Peters, Wendy Bertram, Nicholas Howells, Julie Bruce, Christopher Eccleston, Rachael Gooberman-Hill

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle (Academic Journal)peer-review

3 Citations (Scopus)
12 Downloads (Pure)

Abstract

ObjectivesDescribe the screening and recruitment process of a randomised trial and evaluate associations with knee pain and function three months after total knee replacement (TKR).MethodsTo screen for a multi-centre trial, 5036 patients were sent an Oxford Knee Score (OKS) questionnaire 10 weeks post-TKR. Patients who reported pain in their replaced knee (≤14 on OKS pain component), completed a second OKS 12 weeks post-TKR. Those still experiencing pain 12 weeks post-TKR completed a detailed questionnaire 13 weeks post-TKR. These data were used to characterise pain in a cross-sectional analysis. Multivariable regression was performed, identifying factors associated with pain and function at 13 weeks post-TKR. Results We received OKS questionnaires from 3058/5063 (60%) TKR patients, 907/3058 (30%) reported pain in their replaced knee 10-weeks post-operatively. By 12-weeks, 179/553 (32%) patients reported improved pain (OKS>14). At 13-weeks, 192/363 (53%) who completed a detailed questionnaire reported neuropathic pain, 94/362 (26%) reported depression symptoms and 95/363 (26%) anxiety symptoms. More severe pain at 13-weeks post-operatively was associated with poorer general health, poorer physical health, more pain worry and lower satisfaction with surgery outcome. More severe functional limitation was associated with higher levels of depression, more pain worry, lower satisfaction with surgery outcome and higher pain acceptance.ConclusionsScreening after TKR identified people with pain. We identified several potential targets (physical and mental health outcomes, acceptance of pain and quality of life) for tailored intervention to improve outcomes for patients. Trials of multidisciplinary interventions are now needed.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)790-798
Number of pages9
JournalArthritis Care and Research
Volume74
Issue number5
Early online date18 Nov 2020
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 May 2022

Bibliographical note

Funding Information:
Supported by the NIHR (program grant for applied research RP‐PG‐0613‐20001) and the NIHR Biomedical Research Centre at the University Hospitals Bristol and Weston NHS Foundation Trust and the University of Bristol. Dr. Bruce's work was supported by University Hospitals Coventry and Warwickshire (NIHR research capability funding).

Publisher Copyright:
© 2020 The Authors. Arthritis Care & Research published by Wiley Periodicals LLC on behalf of American College of Rheumatology.

Structured keywords

  • BRTC

Keywords

  • Total knee replacement
  • chronic pain
  • function
  • neuropathic pain
  • post-operative screening

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