Seismic performance assessment of monopile-supported offshore wind turbines using unscaled natural earthquake records

Raffaele De Risi*, Subhamoy Bhattacharya, Katsuichiro Goda

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle (Academic Journal)peer-review

49 Citations (Scopus)
325 Downloads (Pure)

Abstract

The number of offshore wind turbine farms in seismic regions has been increasing globally. The seismic performance of steel monopile-supported wind turbines, which are the most popular among viable structural systems, has not been investigated thoroughly and more studies are needed to understand the potential vulnerability of these structures during extreme seismic events and to develop more reliable design and assessment procedures. This study investigates the structural performance assessment of a typical offshore wind turbine subjected to strong ground motions. Finite element models of an offshore wind turbine are developed and subjected to unscaled natural seismic records. For the first time, the sensitivity to earthquake types (i.e. crustal, inslab, and interface) and the influence of soil deformability and modeling details are investigated through cloud-based seismic fragility analysis. It is observed that monopile-supported offshore wind turbines are particularly vulnerable to extreme crustal and interface earthquakes, and the vulnerability increases when the structure is supported by soft soils. Moreover, a refined structural modeling is generally necessary to avoid overestimation of the seismic capacity of offshore wind turbines.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)154-172
Number of pages19
JournalSoil Dynamics and Earthquake Engineering
Volume109
Early online date22 Mar 2018
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Jun 2018

Keywords

  • Crustal earthquakes
  • Inslab earthquakes
  • Interface earthquakes
  • Seismic performance
  • Soil-structure interaction
  • Wind turbines

Fingerprint

Dive into the research topics of 'Seismic performance assessment of monopile-supported offshore wind turbines using unscaled natural earthquake records'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this