Selective Quality Rendering by Exploiting Human Inattentional Blindness: Looking but not Seeing

K Cater, A Chalmers, P Ledda

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference Contribution (Conference Proceeding)

60 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

There are two major influences on human visual attention: bottom-up and top-down processing. Bottom-up processing is the automatic direction of gaze to lively or colourful objects as determined by low-level vision. In contrast, top-down processing is consciously directed attention in the pursuit of predetermined goals or tasks. Previous work in perception-based rendering has exploited bottom-up visual attention to control detail (and therefore time) spent on rendering parts of a scene. In this paper, we demonstrate the principle of Inattentional Blindness, a major side effect of top-down processing, where portions of the scene unrelated to the specific task go unnoticed. In our experiment, we showed a pair of animations rendered at different quality levels to 160 subjects, and then asked if they noticed a change. We instructed half the subjects to simply watch our animation, while the other half performed a specific task during the animation. When parts of the scene, outside the focus of this task, were rendered at lower quality, almost none of the task-directed subjects noticed, whereas the difference was clearly visible to the control group. Our results clearly show that top-down visual processing can be exploited to reduce rendering times substantially without compromising perceived visual quality in interactive tasks.
Translated title of the contributionSelective Quality Rendering by Exploiting Human Inattentional Blindness: Looking but not Seeing
Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationUnknown
PublisherAssociation for Computing Machinery (ACM)
Pages17 - 24
Number of pages7
Publication statusPublished - Nov 2002

Bibliographical note

Conference Proceedings/Title of Journal: Symposium on Virtual Reality Software and Technology 2002

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