Self-reported smoking cessation interventions were not associated with quitting in older women

K Schroeder, DA Lawlor, D Montaner, S Ebrahim

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle (Academic Journal)peer-review

6 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objective To determine the extent to which smoking cessation interventions are used in the community and their relative success in older women. Study Design and Setting Prospective cohort study located in 23 general practices in England, Scotland. and Wales and including 3,622 women aged 60 to 79 years at recruitment from the British Women's Heart and Health Study. Results Of the 370 smokers at baseline, 77 (21%) had stopped smoking at 3 years, reducing the prevalence of smoking from 10.2% to 8.8%. Women who were light smokers (
Translated title of the contributionSelf-reported smoking cessation interventions were not associated with quitting in older women
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)622e - 628e
Number of pages7
JournalJournal of Clinical Epidemiology
Volume59(6)
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jun 2006

Bibliographical note

Publisher: Elsevier

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