Selling cannabis regulation: Learning From Ballot Initiatives in the United States in 2012

Emily Crick, Dave Bewley-Taylor, Mark Cooke

Research output: Book/ReportOther report

Abstract

In November 2012, Washington, Colorado, and Oregon voted on ballot initiatives to establish legally regulated markets for the production, sale, use and taxation of cannabis.1 Washington and Colorado’s measures won by wide margins, while Oregon’s lost soundly. A majority of voters view cannabis in a negative light, but also feel that prohibition for non-medical and non-scientific purposes is not working. As a result, they are more likely to support well-crafted reform policies that include strong regulations and direct tax revenue to worthy causes such as public health and education. Selling Cannabis Regulation; Learning From Ballot Initiatives in the United States in 2012 reviews and analyses what may lie behind the successes and failures of the ballot measures in Washington, Colorado and Oregon, as well as examine the changing national context for cannabis reform. It concludes by bringing together some of the lessons learned within these states in what has been referred to as the process of ‘selling’ policy ideas to the voting public.
Original languageEnglish
PublisherGlobal Drug Policy Observatory
Publication statusPublished - 2014

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