Shifts in discharge-concentration relationships as a small catchment recover from severe drought

Tim P. Burt*, Fred Worrall, Nicholas J K Howden, Malcolm G. Anderson

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle (Academic Journal)peer-review

27 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

This paper provides evidence of the recovery of a small, moorland catchment to a severe drought, the most extreme on record in the UK. We present a detailed water quality time series for the post-drought recovery period, from the first significant storm event at the end of the drought through three very wet months during which time the catchment fully wetted up. High-frequency observations were obtained using pump water samplers, at 15-min intervals for storm events and 2 hourly at other times. There are significant shifts in discharge-concentration response as the catchment wets up; initial behaviour is very different to later storms. Extreme drought may become more common in a warmer world, so it is increasingly important to understand water quality response during and after such episodes, if their impact on water resources and in-stream ecology is to be better anticipated.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)498-507
Number of pages10
JournalHydrological Processes
Volume29
Issue number4
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 15 Feb 2015

Keywords

  • Chemographs
  • Drought
  • Hysteresis
  • Water quality

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