Snake River Plain-Yellowstone silicic volcanism: implications for magma genesis and crustal evolution

W. P. Leeman, CJ Annen, J. Dufek

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter in a book

Abstract

The origin of large-volume, high-temperature silicic volcanism associated with onset of the Snake River Plain – Yellowstone (SRPY) hotspot track is addressed based on evolution of the well-characterized Miocene Bruneau–Jarbidge (BJ) eruptive centre. Although O–Sr–Pb isotopic and bulk compositions of BJ rhyolites exhibit strong crustal affinity, including strong 18O-depletion, Nd isotopic data preclude wholesale melting of ancient basement rocks and implicate involvement of a juvenile component – possibly derived from contemporaneous basaltic magmas. Several lines of evidence, including limits on 18O-depletion of the rhyolite source rocks due to influx of meteoric/hydrothermal fluids, constrain rhyolite generation to depths shallower than mid-upper crust (,20 km depth). For crustal melting driven by basaltic intrusions, sustenance of temperatures exceeding 900 8C at such depths over the life of the BJ eruptive centre requires incremental intrusion of approximately 16 km of basalt into the crust. This minimum basaltic flux (c. 4 mm year21) is about one-tenth that at Kilauea. Nevertheless, emplacement of such volumes of magma in the crust creates a serious room problem, requiring that the crust must undergo significant extensional deformation – seemingly exceeding present estimates of extensional strain for the SRPY province.
Translated title of the contributionSnake River Plain-Yellowstone silicic volcanism: implications for magma genesis and crustal evolution
Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationDynamics of crustal magma transfer, storage and differentiation
EditorsC. Annen, Zellmer , F G.
PublisherGeological Society of London
Pages235 - 259
Volume304
Publication statusPublished - 2008

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