Spatial and temporal Antarctic Ice Sheet mass trends, glacio-isostatic adjustment, and surface processes from a joint inversion of satellite altimeter, gravity, and GPS data

Alba Martin Espanol, Andrew Zammit Mangion, Peter J. Clarke, Thomas Flament, Veit Helm, Matt A. King, Scott B. Luthcke, Elizabeth Petrie, Frederique Rémy, Nana Schoen, Bert Wouters, Jonathan Bamber*

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle (Academic Journal)peer-review

50 Citations (Scopus)
330 Downloads (Pure)

Abstract

We present spatiotemporal mass balance trends for the Antarctic Ice Sheet from a statistical inversion of satellite altimetry, gravimetry, and elastic-corrected GPS data for the period 2003-2013. Our method simultaneously determines annual trends in ice dynamics, surface mass balance anomalies, and a time-invariant solution for glacio-isostatic adjustment while remaining largely independent of forward models. We establish that over the period 2003-2013, Antarctica has been losing mass at a rate of -84 ± 22 Gt yr-1, with a sustained negative mean trend of dynamic imbalance of -111 ± 13 Gt yr-1. West Antarctica is the largest contributor with -112 ± 10 Gt yr-1, mainly triggered by high thinning rates of glaciers draining into the Amundsen Sea Embayment. The Antarctic Peninsula has experienced a dramatic increase in mass loss in the last decade, with a mean rate of -28 ± 7 Gt yr-1 and significantly higher values for the most recent years following the destabilization of the Southern Antarctic Peninsula around 2010. The total mass loss is partly compensated by a significant mass gain of 56 ± 18 Gt yr-1 in East Antarctica due to a positive trend of surface mass balance anomalies.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)182-200
Number of pages19
JournalJournal of Geophysical Research: Earth Surface
Volume121
Issue number2
Early online date3 Feb 2016
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 14 Mar 2016

Keywords

  • Antarctica
  • GIA
  • Ice dynamics
  • Mass balance
  • SMB

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