Speech and Gesture Emphasis Effects for Robotic and Human Communicators: A Direct Comparison

Paul Bremner, Ute Leonards

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference Contribution (Conference Proceeding)

11 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Emphasis, by means of either pitch accents or beat gestures (rhythmic co-verbal gestures with no semantic meaning), has been shown to serve two main purposes in human communication: syntactic disambiguation and salience. To use beat gestures in this role, interlocutors must be able to integrate them with the speech they accompany. Whether such integration is possible when the multi-modal communication information is produced by a humanoid robot, and whether it is as efficient as for human communicators, are questions that need to be answered to further understanding of the efficacy of humanoid robots for naturalistic human-like communication. Here, we present an experiment which, using a fully within subjects design, shows that there is a marked difference in speech and gesture integration between human and robot communicators, being significantly less effective for the robot. In contrast to beat gestures, the effects of speech emphasis are the same whether that speech is played through a robot or as part of a video of a human. Thus, while integration of speech emphasis and verbal information do occur for robot communicators, integration of non-informative beat gestures and verbal information does not, despite comparable timing and motion profiles to human gestures.

Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationACM/IEEE International Conference on Human-Robot Interaction
PublisherIEEE Computer Society
Pages255-262
Number of pages8
Volume2015-March
ISBN (Print)9781450328821
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2 Mar 2015
Event10th Annual ACM/IEEE International Conference on Human-Robot Interaction, HRI 2015 - Portland, United States
Duration: 2 Mar 20155 Mar 2015

Conference

Conference10th Annual ACM/IEEE International Conference on Human-Robot Interaction, HRI 2015
CountryUnited States
CityPortland
Period2/03/155/03/15

Structured keywords

  • Brain and Behaviour
  • Cognitive Science
  • Visual Perception

Keywords

  • human-robot interaction
  • gestures
  • humanoid robots

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