Sticking to the Union? Nationalism, inequality and political disaffection and the geography of Scotland's 2014 independence referendum

C. J. Pattie, Ron Johnston

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle (Academic Journal)peer-review

12 Citations (Scopus)
185 Downloads (Pure)

Abstract

Scotland’s 2014 Independence Referendum affords a rare opportunity to examine public support for the break-up of a long-established, stable democracy. Analyses of support for Scottish independence reveal that while issues of national identity loomed large in the vote, they were not the only factors involved. Questions around the economic and political direction of the state, and around uneven development, ideology and trust in established politicians also influenced voters’ decisions. Partisanship also mattered, as voters were more likely than not to follow the lead of their party in what had become a highly partisan contest. But some parties – especially Labour – saw large minorities of their supporters vote against the party’s line to support independence.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)83-96
Number of pages14
JournalRegional and Federal Studies
Volume27
Issue number1
Early online date3 Nov 2016
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jan 2017

Keywords

  • Referendum
  • Scotland
  • independence
  • vote

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