Stimulated variation and cascades: Two processes in the evolution of complex technological systems

M.J. O'Brien, RA Bentley

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle (Academic Journal)peer-review

37 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Michael Schiffer’s theoretical and methodological contributions to archaeology are substantial. For the last two decades, Schiffer has become increasingly interested in the history of electrical technology, including portable radios, electric automobiles, eighteenth-century electrostatic technology, and, most recently, nineteenth-century electric light and power systems. Schiffer has long held a behavioral view, which focuses analytical attention on interactions between humans and material things, including complex technological systems (CTSs). For Schiffer, two key aspects of the evolution of CTSs are stimulated variation, defined as an increase in invention resulting from changing selective conditions, and cascading, defined as sequential spurts of invention that occur through the recognition of emergent performance problems in a CTS. To attain maximum usefulness, these concepts should be placed in a modern evolutionary framework that correctly identifies, and does not oversell, the role played by cultural selection. Research on individual and social learning provides the critical link between Schiffer’s stimulated variation and cascade models and the diffusion of CTSs.
Translated title of the contributionStimulated variation and cascades: Two processes in the evolution of complex technological systems
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1-17
JournalJournal of Archaeological Method and Theory
Volume9
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2011

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'Stimulated variation and cascades: Two processes in the evolution of complex technological systems'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this