Stress versus coarticulation: Towards an integrated approach to explicit speech segmentation

S Mattys

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle (Academic Journal)peer-review

53 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Although word stress has been hailed as a powerful speech-segmentation cue, the results of 5 cross-modal fragment priming experiments revealed limitations to stress-based segmentation. Specifically, the stress pattern of auditory primes failed to have any effect on the lexical decision latencies to related visual targets. A determining factor was whether the onset of the prime was coarticulated with the preceding speech fragment. Uncoarticulated (i.e., concatenated) primes facilitated priming. Coarticulated ones did not. However, when the primes were presented in a background of noise, the pattern of results reversed, and a strong stress effect emerged: Stress-initial primes caused more pruning than non-initial-stress primes, regardless of the coarticulatory cues. The results underscore the role of coarticulation in the segmentation of clear speech and that of stress in impoverished listening conditions. More generally, they call for an integrated and signal-contingent approach to speech segmentation.
Translated title of the contributionStress versus coarticulation: Towards an integrated approach to explicit speech segmentation
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)397 - 408
Number of pages12
JournalJournal of Experimental Psychology: Human Perception and Performance
Volume30 (2)
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jun 2004

Bibliographical note

Publisher: American Psychological Association

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