Skip to content

Striking a balance: physical activity, screen-viewing and homework during the transition to secondary school

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Original languageEnglish
Article number3174
Number of pages17
JournalInternational Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health
Volume16
Issue number17
DOIs
DateAccepted/In press - 25 Aug 2019
DatePublished (current) - 30 Aug 2019

Abstract

Physical activity levels decline and screen-viewing behaviours increase during childhood and adolescence. The transition to secondary school appears to coincide with a sharp decline in physical activity. Parents have the potential to influence their child’s behaviours, yet little is known about their expectations for their child’s physical activity and screen-viewing during this transition. This paper explores parents’ expectations for their children’s physical activity and screen-viewing as they transition from primary to secondary school, and their proposed strategies for managing these behaviours during this time. Forty-two parents of children aged 10-11 years participated in a semi-structured telephone interviews in July 2017 or March 2018. The interview data were analysed via inductive and deductive content analysis to explore parents’ perceptions of physical activity and screen-viewing during transition, the reasons for their perceptions, and the strategies they intended to implement to help their child balance their behaviours. Most parents expected both physical activity and screen-viewing to increase during this transition. There were several individual, social and school-level factors influencing these expectations. Overall, parents felt that helping their child balance their activity levels, screen-viewing and homework would be challenging.

    Research areas

  • Children, Physical activity, School transition, Screen-viewing

Download statistics

No data available

Documents

Documents

  • Full-text PDF (final published version)

    Rights statement: This is the final published version of the article (version of record). It first appeared online via MDPI at https://www.mdpi.com/1660-4601/16/17/3174. Please refer to any applicable terms of use of the publisher.

    Final published version, 673 KB, PDF document

    Licence: CC BY

DOI

View research connections

Related faculties, schools or groups