Structural coloration in a fossil feather

Jakob Vinther, Derek E G Briggs, Julia Clarke, Gerald Mayr, Richard O. Prum

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle (Academic Journal)peer-review

86 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Investigation of feathers from the famous Middle Eocene Messel Oil Shale near Darmstadt, Germany shows that they are preserved as arrays of fossilized melanosomes, the surrounding beta-keratin having degraded. The majority of feathers are preserved as aligned rod-shaped eumelanosomes. In some, however, the barbules of the open pennaceous, distal portion of the feather vane are preserved as a continuous external layer of closely packed melanosomes enclosing loosely aligned melanosomes. This arrangement is similar to the single thin-film nanostructure that generates an iridescent, structurally coloured sheen on the surface of black feathers in many lineages of living birds. This is, to our knowledge, the first evidence of preservation of a colour-producing nanostructure in a fossil feather and confirms the potential for determining colour differences in ancient birds and other dinosaurs.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)128-131
Number of pages4
JournalBiology Letters
Volume6
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 23 Feb 2010

Keywords

  • Bird
  • Feather colour
  • Feather preservation
  • Melanosome

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