Structural Fluctuations in Enzyme-Catalyzed Reactions: Determinants of Reactivity in Fatty Acid Amide Hydrolase from Multivariate Statistical Analysis of Quantum Mechanics/Molecular Mechanics Paths

Alessi Lodola, Jitnapa Sirirak, Natalie Fey, Silvia Rivara, Marco Mor, Adrian J. Mulholland

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle (Academic Journal)peer-review

45 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The effects of structural fluctuations, due to protein dynamics, on enzyme activity are at the heart of current debates on enzyme catalysis. There is evidence that fatty acid amide hydrolase (FAAH) is an enzyme for which reaction proceeds via a high-energy, reactive conformation, distinct from the predominant enzyme substrate complex (Lodola et al. Biophys. J. 2007, 92, L20-22). Identifying the structural causes of differences in reactivity between conformations in such complex systems is not trivial. Here, we show that multivariate analysis of key structural parameters can identify structural determinants of barrier height by analysis of multiple reaction paths. We apply a well-tested quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics (QM/MM) method to the first step of the acylation reaction between FAAH and oleamide substrate for 36 different starting structures. Geometrical parameters (consisting of the key bond distances that change during the reaction) were collected and used for principal component analysis (PCA), partial least-squares (PLS) regression analysis, and multiple linear regression (MLR) analysis. PCA indicates that different "families" of enzyme substrate conformations arise from QM/MM molecular dynamics simulation and that rarely sampled, catalytically significant conformational states can be identified, PLS and MLR analyses allowed the construction of linear regression models, correlating the calculated activation barriers with simple geometrical descriptors. These analyses reveal the presence of two fully independent geometrical effects, explaining 78% of the variation in the activation barrier, which are directly correlated with transition-state stabilization (playing a major role in catalysis) and substrate binding. These results highlight the power of statistical approaches of this type in identifying crucial structural features that contribute to enzyme reactivity.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)2948-2960
Number of pages13
JournalJournal of Chemical Theory and Computation
Volume6
Issue number9
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Sep 2010

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