Substantial high affinity methanotroph populations in Andisols effect high rates of atmospheric methane oxidation

PJ Maxfield, ERC Hornibrook, RP Evershed

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle (Academic Journal)peer-review

9 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Methanotrophic bacteria in soils derived from volcanic ash (Andisols) were characterized via time series 13C-phospholipid fatty acid (PLFA) labelling. Three Andisols were incubated under 2 ppmv 13CH4 for up to 18 weeks, thus enabling high-affinity methanotrophs to be selectively characterized and quantified. PLFA profiles from all soils were broadly similar, but the magnitude of the high-affinity methanotrophic populations determined through 13C-PLFA-stable isotope probing displayed sizeable differences. Substantial incorporation of 13C indicated very large high-affinity methanotrophic populations in two of the soils. Such high values are far in excess (10×) of those observed for a range of mineral soils incubated under similar conditions (Bull et al., 2000; Maxfield et al., 2006; 2008a, b). Two of the three Andisols studied also displayed high but variable CH4 oxidation rates ranging from 0.03 to 1.58 nmol CH4 g−1 d.wt. h−1. These findings suggest that Andisols, a previously unstudied soil class with respect to high-affinity methanotrophic bacteria, may oxidize significant amounts of atmospheric methane despite their low areal coverage globally.
Translated title of the contributionSubstantial high affinity methanotroph populations in Andisols effect high rates of atmospheric methane oxidation
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)450 - 456
Number of pages7
JournalEnvironmental Microbiology Reports
Volume1(5)
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Aug 2009

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