Talking rights or what is right? Understandings and strategies around sexual, reproductive and abortion rights in Nicaragua

Sarah Bradshaw*, Goya Wilson Vasquez, Ana Criquillion, Vilma A. Castillo

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter in a book

Abstract

This paper explores how women’s rights are being produced and reproduced in the Nicaraguan context and in the light of the recent change to the abortion law. It highlights differences in understandings of rights, not just between the state and/or its associated actors on the one hand and the women’s movements on the other, but also within the women’s movements. At the same time the paper notes similarities in the discourses of apparently very diverse actors, in that they have limited engagement with ideas of women’s autonomy and freedom to choose as a ‘right’. The paper suggests that a common understanding of what constitutes gendered rights, even between women activists, cannot be assumed. The paper draws on a number of research projects conducted by the authors for the Nicaraguan feminist NGO, Puntos de Encuentro, around rights. In particular it draws on a series of interviews with women leaders and an internal reflection process undertaken in Puntos in 2005 (Bradshaw 2006; Bradshaw and Criquillion 2007) and on more recent semi-structured interviews with Nicaraguan women and focus group discussions with NGOs working for gender equality, undertaken during the summer of 2007 (Castillo and Wilson 2007; Wilson and Castillo 2007).
Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationGender, Rights and Development: A Global Sourcebook
EditorsMaitrayee Mukhopadhyay, Shamim Meer
Place of PublicationAmsterdam
PublisherRoyal Tropical Institute (KIT)
Chapter2
Pages57-68
Number of pages12
ISBN (Print)978-90-6832-742-7
Publication statusPublished - 2008

Publication series

NameGender, Society & Development
PublisherRoyal Tropical Institute (KIT)

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