Tangibles in the balance: A discovery learning task with physical or graphical materials

Paul Marshall*, Peter C.H. Cheng, Rosemary Luckin

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference Contribution (Conference Proceeding)

29 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

An assumption behind much work on the use of tangibles for learning is that there are individual cognitive benefits related to the physical manipulation of materials. However, previous work that has shown learning benefits in using physical materials often hasn't adequately controlled for the covariates of physicality. In this paper, we describe a study where we compared the effects on adults' discovery learning on a balance beam task of using either physical or graphical materials and with either control or no control over the design of experiments. No effects were found of either the type of learning material or the level of control over the experimental design.

Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationTEI'10 - Proceedings of the 4th International Conference on Tangible, Embedded, and Embodied Interaction
Pages153-160
Number of pages8
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 19 Apr 2010
Event4th International Conference on Tangible, Embedded, and Embodied Interaction, TEI'10 - Cambridge, MA, United States
Duration: 25 Jan 201027 Jan 2010

Conference

Conference4th International Conference on Tangible, Embedded, and Embodied Interaction, TEI'10
CountryUnited States
CityCambridge, MA
Period25/01/1027/01/10

Keywords

  • Balance beam task
  • Graphical
  • Physical
  • Tangibles

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    Marshall, P., Cheng, P. C. H., & Luckin, R. (2010). Tangibles in the balance: A discovery learning task with physical or graphical materials. In TEI'10 - Proceedings of the 4th International Conference on Tangible, Embedded, and Embodied Interaction (pp. 153-160) https://doi.org/10.1145/1709886.1709914