Teacher accountability in context: Tanzanian primary school teachers' perceptions of local community and education administration

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle (Academic Journal)peer-review

25 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Evaluations, tied to specific programmes, need to be complemented by research that is more sensitive to context at the classroom level. A comparative approach may be used as a platform to move into a two-way conversation with the perspectives of practitioners in 'developing' countries and hence scrutinize internationally dominant notions of good teaching that are often assumed in applied research, such as evaluations. This paper draws on findings from a theoretically oriented study of primary school teacher identity in Tanzania, in which explicit comparisons are made with teacher identity in England. The analysis shows how Tanzanian teachers see their social identity and professional responsibilities as being co-constructed and shared with parents, the local community and education administration. A comparison is made with English constructs of professional responsibility and accountability in order to draw some lessons for the conduct and interpretation of evaluations.
Translated title of the contributionTeacher accountability in context: Tanzanian primary school teachers' perceptions of local community and education administration
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)43 - 61
Number of pages19
JournalCompare: A Journal of Comparative and International Education
Volume35(1)
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Mar 2005

Bibliographical note

Other identifier: 03057925

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