Temporal analysis of the spontaneous baroreceptor reflex during mild emotional stress in the rat

D Bajic, T Loncar-Turukalo, S Stojicic, O Sarenac, T Bojic, D Murphy, JFR Paton, N Japundzic-Zigon

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle (Academic Journal)peer-review

25 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The effect of emotional stress on the spontaneous baroreceptor reflex (sBRR) in freely moving rats was investigated. Six male Wistar rats equipped with an intra-arterial polyethylene catheter were exposed to a 2-min air-jet stress. For time course analysis of the sBRR response to stress, the records of systolic blood pressure (SBP) and pulse interval (PI) were divided into five regions: baseline (BASELINE), acute exposure to air-jet stress (STRESS), immediate recovery (IMMED. RECOVERY), remaining recovery (RECOVERY), and delayed response (DELAYED RESPONSE). In addition to sBRR sensitivity and effectiveness, we introduce the sequence coverage area and its median for evaluation of the sBRR operating range and set point. During exposure to STRESS and IMMED. RECOVERY, sBRR sensitivity was preserved, its effectiveness was decreased, its operating range was enlarged, and the set point was shifted towards higher SBP and lower PI values. According to the joint symbolic dynamics analysis, the SBP and PI relationship became less predictable hence more prone to respond to stress. In RECOVERY the parameters regained baseline values and DELAYED RESPONSE occurred during which re-setting of sBRR was noted. It follows that emotional stress modulates sBRR differentially during the time course of stress and recovery, affecting both linearity and unpredictability of the BP and PI relationship.
Translated title of the contributionTemporal analysis of the spontaneous baroreceptor reflex during mild emotional stress in the rat
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)142 - 154
Number of pages13
JournalStress
Volume13(2)
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Mar 2010

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