The ADP-ribose-1''-monophosphatase domains of severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus and human coronavirus 229E mediate resistance to antiviral interferon responses

Thomas Kuri, Klara K Eriksson, Akos Putics, Roland Züst, Eric J Snijder, Andrew D Davidson, Stuart G Siddell, Volker Thiel, John Ziebuhr, Friedemann Weber

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle (Academic Journal)peer-review

56 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Several plus-strand RNA viruses encode proteins containing macrodomains. These domains possess ADP-ribose-1″-phosphatase (ADRP) activity and/or bind poly(ADP-ribose), poly(A) or poly(G). The relevance of these activities in the viral life cycle has not yet been resolved. Here, we report that genetically engineered mutants of severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus (SARS-CoV) and human coronavirus 229E (HCoV-229E) expressing ADRP-deficient macrodomains displayed an increased sensitivity to the antiviral effect of alpha interferon compared with their wild-type counterparts. The data suggest that macrodomain-associated ADRP activities may have a role in viral escape from the innate immune responses of the host.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1899-905
Number of pages7
JournalJournal of General Virology
Volume92
Issue numberPt 8
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Aug 2011

Keywords

  • Amino Acid Sequence
  • Antiviral Agents
  • Cell Line
  • Coronavirus 229E, Human
  • Coronavirus Infections
  • Humans
  • Interferon-alpha
  • Molecular Sequence Data
  • Phosphoric Monoester Hydrolases
  • Protein Structure, Tertiary
  • SARS Virus
  • Sequence Alignment
  • Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome
  • Viral Proteins

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