The All-Asian Women's Conference 1931: Indian women and their leadership of a pan-Asian feminist organisation

Sumita Mukherjee*

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle (Academic Journal)

4 Citations (Scopus)
573 Downloads (Pure)

Abstract

In January 1931, the All-Asian Women's Conference (AAWC) convened in Lahore. Forty-five female delegates met to discuss common social and political concerns of women in Asia, such as infant mortality, suffrage, education and rights of inheritance. Organised by Indian women, along with the Irish Theosophist Margaret Cousins, the AAWC spoke to visions of pan-Asianism that were reflected by male Indian nationalists at the time. Keen to counteract the Euro-American centrism of international women's organisations, Asian women discussed the ways they could organise together. This article analyses the rhetoric within the conference, through its reports, correspondence and international newspapers and periodicals. It discusses the ways pan-Asianism was conceived by Indian women in the 1930s and explains why there was only ever one meeting of the AAWC.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)363-381
Number of pages19
JournalWomen's History Review
Volume26
Issue number3
Early online date21 Jun 2016
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 5 Apr 2017

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