The benefits of the Biotechnology and Biological Sciences Research Council (BBSRC) Diet and Health Research Industry Club (DRINC) to early career researchers working in food, nutrition and human health

Dani Ferriday, Myriam M.-L. Grundy, Charlotte Mills

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle (Academic Journal)peer-review

1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

The Biotechnology and Biological Sciences Research Council (BBSRC) Diet and Health Research Industry Club (DRINC) scheme has benefited both academic researchers and members of the food and drink industry. In particular, the Club has given early career researchers (ECRs), working in food, nutrition and human health, the opportunity to work in multidisciplinary projects within a community that has provided support and a training platform for essential transferable skills. After 14 years of success, the DRINC initiative will be coming to an end in 2021. What will come next? How can the next generation of ECRs pursue a career in this research topic without this fantastic opportunity?
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)435-441
Number of pages7
JournalNutrition Bulletin
Volume43
Issue number4
Early online date26 Oct 2018
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Dec 2018

Structured keywords

  • Brain and Behaviour
  • Nutrition and Behaviour
  • Physical and Mental Health

Keywords

  • early career researchers
  • funding
  • health
  • nutrition
  • research councils
  • scientific progression

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