The dearth of managerialism in the implementation of national assessment policy

J-A Baird, L Lee-Kelley

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle (Academic Journal)peer-review

11 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Introducing new national examinations is a complex, multi-agency policy implementation. However, there have been some high-profile problems in examination systems in recent years. This research investigated what 10 UK managers involved in the process thought were the main problems. Time pressures were recognised as a serious problem by the managers, as well as the politically driven nature of the reform. It is argued that network management explains the lack of high-profile individual leaders, the delegation issues, the apparent lack of traditional management skills, the low level of planning and monitoring, the absence of scoping, a professionalist approach, the lack of separation between policy and implementation and the fact that managers could not specify from the outset what needed to be done for a new round of examination developments. Inter-agency power relationships accounted for lack of negotiation of timescales. Recommendations are made for construction of a qualification development blueprint, scoping of resources, appraisal of the human resources shortage in the UK assessment sector and better stakeholder management of the qualification development policy community by government.
Translated title of the contributionThe dearth of managerialism in the implementation of national assessment policy
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)55 - 81
Number of pages27
JournalJournal of Education Policy
Volume24
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jan 2009

Bibliographical note

Publisher: Taylor & Francis

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